Five Skin Care Tips For After Your Electrolysis Hair Removal Treatment

July 3rd, 2012
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When a hair is permanently removed, it leaves a small opening in your skin where the hair used to be. Just as with any small break in your skin, you should take special care of the area while the opening heals. Here are five tips from professional electrologists on caring for your skin after your electrolysis hair removal treatment.

1. Sunscreen! Sunscreen! Sunscreen!

Hair removal leaves a tiny opening in your skin where the hair used to be. Sunlight can get in there and burn or tan the newly exposed skin leaving you with little red or brown dots. Like any other tan or burn, these dots will fade with time, but you can prevent them from happening in the first place by making sure to apply sunscreen to the treated area before exposing it to sunlight. Don't just grab any sunscreen off the drugstore shelf either. Choose one with a minimum SPF of 30. Also make sure it is a non-comedogenic (not pore-clogging) sunscreen. If you're not sure if a particular sunscreen is good for treated areas, ask your electrologist.

On that note ...

2. Keep the treated follicles clear.

Avoid cosmetics, creams, and cleansers that can clog the pores. If you are prone to acne, these products can cause little pimples to break out in the treated area. If you must apply makeup after your treatment to go out or to return to work, choose cosmetics that do not plug the newly treated follicles. Remove the makeup as soon as possible (carefully - don't scrub!) and gently swab the area with with witch hazel or a gentle toner. To soothe, use aloe instead of a heavy skin cream. Again, if you're not sure about a product, bring it to your electrologist so they can check it out. In general though, you should try to disturb the newly treated skin as little as possible.

Which brings us to ...

3. Leave it alone!

If you had electrolysis hair removal treatments on your chin or neck, be careful about resting your chin on your hand for a day or two!


Newly electrolysis-treated skin feels so smooth and hairless that it's hard not to touch it, but try to leave it alone for awhile. After the electrolysis hair removal treatment, the area is sanitized and generally a post-treatment cream, serum or other topical soothing product has been applied. Touching the area to see how it feels disturbs the post-treatment applications. If you had a facial area treated, you also want to be aware of unconscious habits like touching your face or sitting with your chin in your hand. You want to keep the treated area as undisturbed and as clean as possible.

That last bit bears repeating ...

4. Keep it clean.

Electrolysis hair removal opens the follicle where the hair used to be. While it heals, you don't want any bacteria getting in there. Infections: they are not fun. Follow the at-home care instructions that your electrologist provides to keep the treated area clean and avoid introducing anything to the treated area shouldn't be there, like bacteria and heavy cream or makeup.

And, speaking of bacteria ...

5. Stay out of the hot tub after electrolysis hair removal.

Actually, stay out of any public water areas, like pools and hot tubs. Either they are heavily chlorinated, or they're not. Neither is good for freshly treated skin. Chlorine is a harsh chemical and the bacteria that occurs when there isn't enough chlorine is not something you want in your newly opened follicles. Give your skin 24-48 hours to heal before you jump in the hot tub or the pool.

If you have any questions, ask your professional electrologist. They can provide all the guidance you need to take care of your skin after your electrolysis hair removal treatment.

Many thanks to these wonderful people for their input!
Barbara Greathouse, LE, CPE
Kelly Morrissy, LE, CPE
Mary M. Federico, CT, LE
Wendy Regoulinsky, Electrologist
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